Social Work in Contexts of Postcolonial Migration: Perspectives on Policies, Institutions and Practices

7.5 credits

In this course, we specifically investigate the field of social work, which includes public, private, nonprofit, national and international activities and operations. We also examine the ways social work changes and relates to increased migration and changing migration patterns and consequences. The course presents and problematizes theories of migration in general and of social work in relation to migration in particular. These theories then form the basis for elaborating and analyzing the link between social work and migration in relation to migration and social policy, welfare institutions, social work practices and the living conditions of individuals and groups.

This course is intended for those who in their current or future work meet people with experience of migration as well as for those who are curious about migration and want to know more about how different societies and societal institutions respond to migration.

This course focuses on social work institutions and practices and how they are guided by migration/social/public policies as well as ethical considerations. The course engages with four main issues central to social work:

• social work as a response to people’s vulnerability

• the control/care dilemma

• social work as a method of enhancing social rights and belonging as well as fostering social wellbeing and change

• professional encounters and treatment in context of postcolonial migration.

During the course, current theories of postcolonial migration and particularly social work are discussed and problematised. These theories then provide the ground for more indepth study and analysis of the connection between social work and postcolonial migration in relation to migration/social/public policy, welfare institutions, social work practices, and the living conditions of particular individuals and groups.

The course is combined with program students at the Faculty of Social Sciences and national-, international- and exchange students who study independent course.

Distance – study where you are

Perhaps you would like to study in the Swedish mountains, in a big city, or at home close to family? Many of our programmes and courses are offered in distance format.

Studying at a distance can be done in different ways, either entirely without physical gatherings or with only a few gatherings on campus or at one of our learning centres. The common denominator is that a large part of your studies takes place online. You communicate with the teacher and other students with the help of a learning platform with discussion forums, group work, recorded lectures and online meetings.

The benefit of distance studies is the flexibility, something that is valuable if you want to be free to decide when and where you want to study. Some compulsory elements on you course or programme may take place during office hours, even though they are online.

Learn more about studying at a distance.

Student working from home

Build your own degree

Did you know that you can combine single-subject courses to build your own degree? In this way, you can design your own degree based on your interests and the career you are aiming for. This does not apply to all courses so make sure to check with a study counsellor at the faculty. Learn more about how you can build your own degree and become unique on the labour market.