Digital Humanities

Recent developments in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and interactive applications are creating new social tools and conditions for people to connect and interact; therefore, changing the ways we communicate, socialize and collaborate. These new forms of digital enhanced communication and collaboration have been rapidly adopted and integrated into people’s everyday lives.

Understanding the nature and consequences of these new interactions and social transformations is crucial if we want to design and shape a better future where digital technologies become an integral component for enriching our life. One major challenge we have identified is the exploration of the two-way interactions between society and ICT with a focus on the Humanities. This particular orientation has the potential to become a key success factor for the values and competitiveness of the entire Linnaeus region having in mind recent EU and Swedish political discussions in the field of Digital Humanities.

Project Information

Project leaders

Koraljka Golub, Marcelo Milrad

Project Assistant

Tamara Laketic

Timetable

2016-

Contact

Vision

Our long-term vision is to create a leading education, development and research regional centre that combines in novel ways already existing expertise from different Linnaues Univesity departments and faculties working in close collaboration and co-creation with people and different organizations (both public and private sector) from the surrounding society. Addressing future societal challenges would be possible by highly skilled professionals whose education has been markedly enhanced by practice-informed education and joint, cross-sector innovation.

News 

 

What we mean by digital humanities

Digital humanities has been attempted to be defined by numerous authors and in many contexts. Here we take the broad viewpoint of it as "a diverse and still emerging field that encompasses the practice of humanities research in and through information technology, and the exploration of how the humanities may evolve through their engagement with technology, media, and computational methods" (Digital Humanities Quarterly Journal). It lies at the intersection of ICT and humanities, which is being continually formulated by scholars and practitioners; it can include but is not limited to topics like big data, data mining, text categorization, metadata, interoperability standards, interactive visualization, GIS (Geographical Information Systems), multimedia games, digital story telling, social network analysis, bibliometrics.

Furthermore, there is a need for collaborative efforts to understand the challenges and possibilities in digital humanities, which we are trying to address with this cross-discipline and cross-sector application. As "the current landscape is multifaceted and characterized by a range of epistemic traditions and modes of engagement, and while there is a great deal of overlap and common interests, there is also a need of increased shared awareness. It could be argued that a better understanding of the landscape of the digital humanities, epistemic traditions and collaborative possibilities are vital to the further development of the field. A respectful dialogue of visions, agendas, competencies and research interests across much of this landscape can help us meet a range of exciting upcoming challenges" (Svensson 2010). As seen from participants' various input related to the short- and long-term values for them and activities which they conduct, they all belong to digital humanities; however, the challenge we would like to address with this project is to find the overlap which is the core of the field, what is the whole picture, and how to combine the "lego" pieces for addressing societal and research challenges in a more comprehensive and systematic approach.

How we would build digital humanities along cross-sector axes

The core idea of our proposal at this first phase (12-15 months) is to establish the foundations for the creation of a Digital Humanities initiative at the Linnaeus region, by combining some already existing expertise and resources at LNU and the wider community through input from related public and private sectors, resulting in the establishment of new top-notch research and highly skilled professionals tackling societal challenges, making LNU indeed "the university where everything is possible". In a second phase (24-48 months) this Digital Humanities initiative could grow into an even broader area based on data, information, knowledge and their relationship with technology, involving more departments, working on projects relevant to society, and creating more attractive professional courses and inter(national) programmes at master level with various specialisations. Our long-term vision is to create a leading education, development and research regional centre that combines in novel ways already existing expertise from different LNU departments and faculties working in close collaboration and co-creation with people and different organizations (both public and private sector) from the surrounding society. Addressing future societal challenges would be possible by highly skilled professionals whose education has been markedly enhanced by practice-informed education and joint, cross-sector innovation.

Strategic values to be developed during these efforts refer to uniting and consolidating the expertise we already have to create new constellations for collaboration leading to new knowledge and products (expertise, education, research, public and commercial services relevant for the region, such as a cultural tourism industry perspective), resulting in a return in investment. Our hope is that, based on the planned achievements, an important value for the general public could be a (re)-affirmation of the value of humanities in particular, and academic practices in general. Our long-term strategy is to develop a creative knowledge environment in the spirit of Linnaeus that carries out prominent development and research activities within the field of Digital Humanities both at regional and international scale, serving as a catalyst for driving a societal change with a focus on innovations and sustainable growth. All these lines of action are much aligned with LNU´s strategy as described in the document "A journey into the future: Vision and strategy 2015–2020".

Participants

Linnaues University and University Library

  • Arwid Lund, Senior Lecturer, Department of Cultural Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Dagmar Brunow, Senior Lecturer, Department of Film and Literature, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Anna Lund, Associate Professor, Department of Cultural Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Nico Reski, Doctoral Student, Department of Media Technology, Faculty of Technology
  • Anders Åberg, Senior Lecturer, Head of Department, Department of Film and Literature, Faculty of Arts and Humanities; Linnaeus University Centre for Intermedial and Multimodal Studies
  • Nuno Otero, Associate Professor, Department of Media Technology, Faculty of Technology
  • Christina Rosén, Senior Lecturer, Department of Languages, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Tamara Laketic, Project Assistant, Department of Cultural Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Charlotte Hommerberg, Senior Lecturer, Department of Languages, Faculty of Arts and Humanities; Linnaeus University Centre for Intermedial and Multimodal Studies
  • Jukka Tyrkkö, Professor, Department of Languages, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Hans Sternudd, Associate Professor, Pro-Dean, Department of Music and Art, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • David Örbring, Lecturer, Department of Cultural Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Jonas Svensson, Professor, Department of Cultural Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Åsa Trulsson, Associate Senior Lecturer, Department of Cultural Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Ted Gunnarsson, Librarian, The University Library
  • Sara Ahlryd, Lecturer, Department of Cultural Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Magnus Levin, Associate Professor, Department of Languages, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Anita Mirijamdotter, Professor, Department of Informatics, Faculty of Technology
  • Mikael Rennemark, Professor, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences
  • Mikko Laitinen, Professor, Department of Languages, Faculty of Arts and Humanities; Linnaeus University Centre for Data Intensive Sciences and Applications
  • Cecilia Trenter, Associate Professor, Department of Cultural Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Beate Schirrmacher, Senior Lecturer, Department of Film and Literature, Faculty of Arts and Humanities; Linnaeus University Centre for Concurrences in Colonial and Postcolonial Studies
  • Johan Höglund, Associate Professor, Department of Languages, Faculty of Arts and Humanities; Linnaeus University Centre for Concurrences in Colonial and Postcolonial Studies
  • Peter Forsgren, Professor, Department of Film and Literature, Faculty of Arts and Humanities; Linnaeus University Centre for Concurrences in Colonial and Postcolonial Studies
  • Aris Alissandrakis, Senior Lecturer, Department of Media Technology, Faculty of Technology
  • Vasilis Papageorgiou, Professor, Department of Film and Literature, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Anette Forsberg, Senior Lecturer, Department of Media and Journalism, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Fredrik Gröhn, Student, Department of Cultural Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Andreas Kerren, Professor, Department of Computer Science, Faculty of Technology
  • Annelie Ekelin, Senior Lecturer, Department of Media and Journalism, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Bodil Petersson, Associate Professor, Department of Cultural Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Helena Carlsson Juhlin, Section Manager, The University Library
  • Ilir Jusufi, Senior Lecturer, Department of Media Technology, Faculty of Technology
  • Ingemar Gunnarsson, Research Strategist, The University Library
  • Joacim Hansson, Professor, Department of Cultural Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Jonas Barck, Administration Leade, The University Library
  • Jørgen Bruhn, Professor, Department of Film and Literature, Faculty of Arts and Humanities; Linnaeus University Centre for Intermedial and Multimodal Studies
  • Kristoffer Holt, Senior Lecturer, Department of Media and Journalism, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Renaud de la Brosse, Professor, Department of Media and Journalism, Faculty of Arts and Humanities
  • Soniya Billore, Senior Lecturer, Department of Marketing, School of Business and Economics
  • Susanna Nordmark, Doctoral Student, Teacher Training Office, Board of Teacher Educaton

Other Academic Institutions

ASIA

China

  • Jianbo Gao, Distinguished Professor, Founding Director, Institute of Complexity Science and Big Data Technology, Guangxi University, China

AUSTRALIA

Australia

EUROPE

Austria

  • Ramón Reichert, University of Vienna, Department for Theatre, Film and Media Studies

Bulgaria:

Croatia

  • Nevena Skrbic Alempijevic, Department of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb
  • Marijana Tomic, Department of Information Science, University of Zadar
  • Franjo Pehar, Department of Information Science, University of Zadar
  • Kresimir Zauder, Department of Information Science, University of Zadar

Denmark

  • Marianne Ping Huang, Developer Cultural Creative Collaborations and Digital Humanities, Faculty of Arts, Aarhus University
  • Henriette Roued-Cunliffe, Royal School of Library and Information Science, University of Copenhagen

Finland

  • Ylva Grufstedt, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture and Art Studies, University of Helsinki
  • Petri Paju, Department of Cultural History, University of Turku
  • Maija Paavolainen, Faculty of Arts, University of Helsinki
  • Mikko Tolonen, Department of Modern Languages, University of Helsinki
  • Eetu Mäkelä, Semantic Computing Research Group (SeCo), Aalto University, University of Helsinki, University of Oxford

France

Germany

Ireland

Italy

Norway

  • Thomas Sørlie Hansen, Faculty of Humanities, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
  • Andreas Bergsland, Music Technology Program, Department of Music, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
  • Annika Rockenberger, Department of Literature, University of Oslo
  • Kim Tallerås, Department of Archivistics, Library and Information Science, University of Oslo and Akershus University College

Slovenia

  • Tanja Merčun Kariž, Department of Library and Information Science and Book studies, University of Ljubljana

Sweden

  • Anna Foka, Associate Senior Lecturer, HUMlab, Umeå University
  • Paula Quinon, Department of Philosophy, The Faculties of Humanities and Theology, Lund University
  • Anamaria Dutceac Segesten, European Studies, Center for Language and Literature, Joint Faculties of Humanities and Theology, Lund University
  • Olle Sköld, Library and Information Science, Department of ABM, University of Uppsala
  • Cecilia Lindhé, Centre for Digital Humanities, Gothenburg University
  • Annemaree Lloyd, Swedish School of Library and Information Science, University of Borås
  • Anna Nilsson Hammar, Department of History, Lund University
  • Johan Åhlfeldt, Centre for Theology and Religious Studies, Lund University (see also http://dare.ht.lu.se, http://monastica.ht.lu.se, http://projekt.ht.lu.se/nyckeln)

United Kingdom

  • Michael Pidd, Digital Director of HRI Digital at the Humanities Research Institute, University of Sheffield

NORTH AMERICA

United States of America

  • Timothy Tangherlini, The Scandinavian Section and Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Marta M. Deyrup, University Libraries, Seton Hall University
  • Manfred Minimair, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Seton Hall University
  • Paige C. Morgan, Digital Humanities Librarian, University of Miami Libraries

SOUTH AMERICA

Brazil

  • João Queiroz, Institute of Arts and Design, Federal University of Juiz de Fora

Ecuador

External public and private sectors

EUROPE

Croatia

  • Koraljka Kuzman Šlogar, The Institute of Ethnology and Folklore Research


Sweden

  • Kafé de Luxe, Nils Hector
  • Information Engineering Center, Represented by Diana Unander Nordle, Research and collaboration project, Linnaeus University
  • Björn Samuelsson, Culture and Leisure Department, Kalmar Municipality
  • Carolina Jonsson-Malm, Center for Applied Cultural Heritage at Kalmar County Museum
  • DiK, Represented by Bo Westas, Professional association and a trade union for university graduates in the fields of culture and communication
  • Norton Ozkoray, Communications consultan
  • Peter Hartman, Entrepreneur
  • Gautam Billore, private consultant
  • AV-Media, Region Kronoberg, Lennart Axelsson
  • Biblioteksutveckling Blekinge Kronoberg (BiBK), Maria Lundquist
  • Biblioteksutveckling Blekinge Kronoberg (BiBK), Weine Sundell
  • Det fria ordets hus, Alexandra Stiernspetz Nylén
  • Kalmar County Museum, Fredrik Gunnarsson
  • Kalmar County Museum, Helena Victor
  • Kulturparken Småland, Håkan Nordmark
  • Smålands Musikarkiv, Mathias Boström
  • Växjö City Library, Robert Bunjaku
  • Växjö Kommun, Daniel Skogberg
  • Växjö Kommun, Fredrik Sandblad

NORTH AMERICA

United States of America

  • Nicole Saylor, Head of the American Folklife Center Archive at the Library of Congresse

Africa

Tunisia

  • Tunisia Broadcasting Authority

Advisors

Australia

Australia

  • Ann McGarth, Director of Australian Centre for Indigenous History

 

EUROPE

Croatia

  • Tatjana Aparac Jelušić, Distinguished Professor, University of Zadar, founder of Joint Master Programme Written heritage in the Digital Environment at the University of Zadar and Osijek, Croatia; co-founder of Libraries in the Digital Age conferences; Founder of the international PhD programme in Information Sciences, together with UCLA and Rutgers

Sweden

  • Elisabet Göransson, Centrum för teologi och religionsvetenskap, Digital tools in the humanities seminar series, Lund University; Forskningsprogrammet Ars edendi, Avdelningen för klassiska språk, Stockholm University
  • Isto Huvila, Department of Archives, Libraries, Museums, Uppsala University
  • Jutta Haider, Advisor role till October 2016 due to external factors, Information Studies, Department of Arts and Cultural Sciences, Lund university
  • Mats Dahlström, Professor in Digital Humanities, the only Swedish iSchool
  • Stefan Gelfgren, Head of Humanites Lab, Umeå University

United Kingdom

  • Jane Winters, Professor of Digital Humanities, School of Advanced Study, University of London
  • Lorna Hughes, Professor in Digital Humanities, School of Humanities, University of Glasgow

Related projects

Two new approved project proposals which grew out of the LNU Digital Humanities Initiative:

  • Developing Attractive Information Landscapes for the Mapping of Cultural Events Using Web Technologies, towards developing a mock-up of an app for cultural events in Småland, starting with Nya Småland as a test bed. Further funding will be sought to complete the app's development.
  • LNU as a Unique iSchool, towards creating one-of-the-kind suite of international distance Master programmes in the field of information (*iField*) which may include Data Science, Digital Humanities, E-Health, Knowledge Management, Business Informatics and others.