Plan your studies

Plan your studies

Being a student in Sweden can be somewhat challenging at first. You are expected to think independently, critically, analytically and to be responsible and plan your own work. Once you get the hang of it, you will see it all pays off in the end.

Film about academic studies in Sweden

How to plan your course schedule

At Swedish universities, students usually study only one or two courses intensively at a time, followed by an exam for each course (consecutive scheduling), instead of studying several different courses simultaneously, with a midterm and a final exam for each course at the end of the semester (parallel scheduling).

The duration and extent of programmes and courses are expressed through the credit system used. One semester (20 weeks) of full-time studies corresponds to 30 credits or 30 ECTS/approximately 15 US semester credits. Single subject courses and modules are generally 7.5 credits each and usually run for five weeks. Full-time studies requires 40 hours of studies (including class time and own studies) per week.

A full-semester course consists of one semester (20 weeks) of full-time studies, divided into several modules. If you choose a full-semester course, you are required to follow the course and the modules exactly as listed in the course outline. Individual modules from different full-semester courses or programmes cannot be combined.

Swedish language course

In addition to your regular study programme, Linnaeus University offers an optional non-credit introductory Swedish course free of charge. The course consists of 30 contact hours with class one evening a week. Students are admitted on a first come, first served basis.

Additional Swedish courses

Students who wish to improve their Swedish further have the opportunity to study Swedish at basic, intermediate or advanced level up to 90 credits. Click at the following link to see a list of the credit courses in the Swedish language.

The Swedish educational system

Linnaeus University is one of about 40 universities and university colleges in Sweden. At the national level, the Swedish Higher Education Authority is responsible for higher education and research. For further information please see www.uk-ambetet.se.

Programmes and courses

At most Swedish universities, students can choose between applying for study programmes, 30-credit full-semester courses or to make a combined application for several single subject courses.
Please note that in order to get residence permit, all international students from outside the EU / EEA or Switzerland are required to be full-time students (i.e. admitted to at least 30 credits per semester) during their stay at Linnaeus University.

The credit system

1.5 credits represent one week of completed full-time studies. They are more or less equal to 1.5 ECTS credits and approximately 0.75 US semester credits. 60 credits represent the workload of one year of full-time studies. The duration and extent of programmes and courses are expressed through the credit system. One semester of full-time studies corresponds to 30 credits or 30 ECTS / approximately 15 US semester credits. Individual courses are generally 7.5 credits (five-week courses in a single subject area) and run consecutively, not simultaneously. Full-time studies requires 40 hours of studies (including class time and own studies) per week.

Examination

All courses include written and / or oral examinations. As a rule, there are no final exams covering the entire semester's course work (i.e. grouping the modules together when enroled in a 30-credit course) or covering an entire study programme. Four different grading scales are used at Linnaeus University. More information regarding these grading scales can be found under the heading "Grading scales" below. If you fail an examination, it may be possible to re-sit the examination later in the semester. The teacher will inform you of the re-examination date. Independent projects and short papers are other examination forms required in some fields of study. The work you have carried out is presented in a seminar where other students and the teacher critically evaluate your work. The grading system is similar to that of an examination.
Please note that if you want your course to be graded according to the ECTS grading system, you need to talk to the person responsible for the course before the course starts.

Academic misconduct

Academic misconduct (i.e. using unauthorised tools in exams, using "crib sheets", or plagiarism) is strictly forbidden. If a student, whether Swedish or international, is suspected of academic misconduct, an investigation is carried out. The vice-chancellor decides, after having questioned the student, whether the case is to:
1. be dismissed with no further measures,
2. result in a warning
3. be referred to the disciplinary board for scrutiny.
Academic misconduct can result in you being given a warning or in your suspension from the university. Please note: academic misconduct is not socially acceptable among students!

Degrees

How to obtain a degree from Linnaeus University

As an international student, you can obtain a degree from Linnaeus University by following the required syllabus for a particular degree. You can also combine credits from your home university with credits from Linnaeus University to meet degree requirements. International students can receive degrees in various disciplines and in both first (undergraduate), second (postgraduate) and third (doctoral) cycles.

First cycle, Bachelor's Degree (180 credits)

A degree of Bachelor requires studies of at least 180 credits at first cycle, of which 90 credits must be in the major discipline. The major discipline must include an independent project of at least 15 credits on Bachelor level.

Second cycle, Master (60 credits)

A degree of Master (60 credits) is awarded after completing 60 credits at Masters level, of which 30 credits must be in the major discipline. The major discipline must include an independent project of at least 15 credits. At least 45 credits must be on second cycle. A Bachelor's degree or the equivalent is required for admission the a Master programme.

Second cycle, Master (120 credits)

A degree of Master (120 credits) is awarded after completing 120 credits at Masters level, of which 60 credits must be in the major discipline. The major discipline must also include one independent project of at least 30 credits, or two independent projects of at least 15 credits each. At least 90 credits must be on second cycle. A Bachelor's degree or the equivalent is required for admission to a Master programme.

Third cycle, Doctoral (240 credits)

A degree of doctorate is awarded after completing 240 credits at doctoral level, of which a minimum of 120 credits consist of a doctoral project. A doctoral programme usually lasts for four years.
It is also possible to enrol in a two-year licentiate degree programme. A licentiate degree is awarded after completing 120 credits at doctoral level, of which a minimum of 60 credits consist of an independent project. All doctoral level programmes include course work, an independent project and research collaboration with supervisors.

Grading scales

Four different grading scales are used at Linnaeus University. Which of the grading scales that is to be used is decided by the faculty responsible for each respective course. A list of a student's completed courses may, therefore, contain a number of different grading scales.

All grades at Linnaeus University are goal-related; that is to say, a student's performance is assessed based on the objectives stated in the course syllabus. A goal-related grade does not indicate how well a student has performed in relation to other students, but instead to what extent he/she has fulfilled the course objectives.

The grading scales used at Linnaeus University are listed below and arranged in order of precedence, from the highest to the lowest grade.

Pass – Fail
This grading scale is used at most faculties, however, primarily for courses that are part of contract educations and courses of practical/aesthetic nature.

Pass with Distinction – Pass – Fail
The traditional grading scale at Swedish universities. This grading scale is mainly used at the Faculty of Social Sciences, the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, and the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences.

Five – Four – Three – Fail
Used for most courses and programmes offered at the Faculty of Technology. This grading scale is in use at most engineering faculties in Sweden.

A–B–C–D–E–F (Fail)
Introduced in 2016 for all courses offered to international students. The school of business and economics uses this grading scale for the vast majority of its courses. The A-F-grading scale assesses students with the grades A, B, C, D, E, Fx or F. In order to pass the course, students need to meet the expected learning outcomes, which are stated in respective course syllabus. The grade A constitutes the highest grade on the scale and the remaining grades follow in descending order where the grade E is the lowest grade on the scale that will result in a pass. The grade F menas that the students' performance is assessed as failed. Fx is not a grade and is only used when a student is allowed to complement the examination. For students who do not pass the examination, retake examinations are provided in accordance with local regulations at Linnaeus University.