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Third-cycle (doctoral) programme in mathematics

Curious to do research in the subject of mathematics? We offer opportunities for research for doctoral students.

What does the third-cycle subject area mathematics comprise?

At Linnaeus University, the field and course of study referred to as mathematics covers a wide spectrum of activities and includes both pure and applied mathematics. Mathematics is an abstract and general science for problem solving and methods development. All research within the field of the subject of mathematics includes development, usage, or analysis of methods.

Within pure mathematics, the abstraction level is so high that the way of presenting a problem can be analysed outside of their original context. Crucial causal relationships are isolated and studied separately. Conceptualisation and concept formation, and use of appropriate terminology, becomes central. Since the discipline of mathematics provides the tools we need to analyse, question and develop scientific methods, it plays a key role in all science.

Within applied mathematics, the link to practical problem solving is clear and is characterised by a deep understanding of the subject of mathematics per se, as well as its application. Innovation and new ways of thinking arise in various different ways, and new methods and approaches are applied to classic problems, or known methods are transferred to new areas of application whereby the presentation of the problems which arise are analysed.

The applications are primarily in fields where a high degree of precision is sought and where the far-reaching predictions are possible. Examples represented in our programme include physics, cryptography and signal processing. Mathematical methods have recently also become established in many sciences where the possibilities of predictions and precision remain more limited. At Linnaeus University, such activities are found within the fields of biology, medical research and economics to mention a few. The goal of the introduction of mathematical methods in such activities is to make all science more quantitative.

Graduate studies in mathematics can contain both pure and applied mathematics, in varying proportions. Doctoral students normally choose a specialisation for their studies in conjunction with the commencement of their graduate programme.

Studies can also be made in mathematics directed towards mathematics education.

More information

  • Read more about entry requirements, content and objectives of the programme in the study plan below
  • General information about third-cycle studies at Linnaeus University
  • Read about possible projects for for you as a doctoral student below
  • The university library's subject guide for mathematics (in Swedish)
  • Vacancies at Linnaeus University

Projects for PhD positions