Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business

The Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business constitutes a union of researchers from several faculties and their departments at Linnaeus University, aimed to conduct novel research within the theme digital business.

Our research

New technologies transform conditions

The background is the enormous development and adoption of the various digital technologies which in turn tend to transform the basic conditions for business conduct. The use of digital technologies may give rise to new forms of business models, such as Skype, Facebook, Spotify, Uber and Airbnb. Innovative uses of digital technologies enable economic value creation in a manner that was not possible prior to the advent of these technologies – one dramatic illustration is the company Apple, whose market value was larger than Sweden's Gross National Product.

The centre is named after a true research pioneer: Dr Gunilla Bradley, professor emerita at the Royal Institute of Technology. Born and raised in Småland-ish Högsby, Professor Bradley started her first study of the digitalization of workplaces already in the 1970's.

The Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business is characterized by a high degree of interdisciplinary research and close relations with the business community. This in turn shall secure that research conducted by the center manifests high relevancy and that its results are provided to those who need it most: businesses that digitalize.The research center is unique in its form, size and focus in Sweden.

Research focus

How can it be that the market value of Facebook is approximately$ 300 billion, while the century-old company Kodak filed for bankruptcy followed by reconstruction in 2012? At the same time, the newly-established company Instagram was acquired for $ 1 billion, even though it was less than a year old and had only a dozen employees! Basically, all these companies did information logistics. Similar situations may be found in other industries, such as music and film distribution (with Spotify or Netflix), newspapers and magazines, book publishing and software development, and increasingly in such professional services industries as accounting or legal and medical advices. Also traditional companies, such as ABB, General Electric, Siemens, many pharmaceutical companies, and financial services provider, pursue digitalization efforts – some succeed, while others fail.

A key question is therefore: what makes a digital business successful? The quest for plausible answers to this and related questions is the rationale for the research conducted at the Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business, which also translates to its mission: to extend knowledge of the success factors of digital businesses.

News

Industry seminars

The Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business offers industry seminars on various aspects of digital business. These seminars present various research outcomes in a practical manner that shows direct relevance to managers faced with digitalization decisions.

The following presents both passed and forthcoming industry seminars. The seminars are open to everyone to partake and you are most welcome.

2017

In cooperation with Information Engineering Center, IEC, GBC organizes a "Digibrunch om digitala affärsmodeller".
Title: Hur använda digitala teknologier för att skapa ekonomiska värden?
By: Professor Darek M Haftor, Department of Informatica, Research Leader for the Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business, Linnaeus University
Language: Swedish
When: Thursday 4 May 2017 at 11.30 am to 1.00 pm
Where: Building Echo, Videum Science Park, Framtidsvägen 18, Växjö
Content: Inspiration workshop – how to develop new business that focuses on sustainability
Application to participate at: http://iec2020.se/digibrunch-om-digitala-affa%CC%88rsmodeller

2016

Title: Circular economy and business model innovation
By: Professor Darek M Haftor & Dr Pejvak Oghazi, the Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business, Linnaeus University
Language: Swedish
When: Friday 9 December 2016 at 1.00–3.00 pm
Where: Centre for Information Logistics (CIL), Garvaren, Ljungby
Content: Inspiration workshop – how to develop new business that focuses on sustainability
Application to participate at: darek.haftor@lnu.se

2015

Autumn 2015

Title: "Produktivitet från användningen av digitala teknologier"
By: Professor Darek M Haftor, Research Leader for the Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business, Linnaeus University
Language: Swedish
When: Thursday 8 October 2015 at 15.15–17.00
Where: Centre for Information Logistcs (CIL), Garvaren, Ljungby

Title: "Tid som produktivitetsresurs i den digitala ekonomin"
By: Associate Professor Fabian von Schéele, Senior Research Fellow at the Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business, Linnaeus University
Language: Swedish
When: Thursday 10 December 2015 at 15.15–17.00
Where: Centre for Information Logistcs (CIL), Garvaren, Ljungby

Spring 2015

Title: "Kommer nya, digitala affärsmodeller att ta andelar av din affär? Praktiska råd vid utveckling av nya digitala affärsmodeller"
By: Professor Darek M Haftor, Research Leader for the Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business, Linnaeus University
Language: Swedish
When: Friday 6 March 2015 at 13.15–14.30
Where: Centre for Information Logistcs (CIL), room Electrolux, Garvaren, Ljungby

Research seminars

The Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business operates a research seminar series that features various scientific aspects of digital business research.

The following list presents both passed and forthcoming research seminars. The seminars are open to everyone to partake and you are most welcome.

2017

 

Spring 2017

Title: Service Logic in Digitalized Product Platforms: Digital Service Innovation in the Vehicle Industry
By
: Dr Soumitra Chowdhury
When
: Thursday 9 February 2017 at 1.15-2.00 pm
Where
: Room B2018, Växjö

Title: Omni-channel – new stage in retail evolution
By: Dr Wojciech Piotriwich, Research Fellow, Tutor in Technology and Operations Management, Oxford Institute of Retail Management – OXIRM, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford
When: Thursday 6 April 2017 at 10.00-12.00 am
Where: B2018, building B, Växjö
More information: Edited book: Supply Chain Design and Management for Emerging Markets, Learning from Countries and Regions. Special issue of Journal of Global Information Technology Management focused on Information Systems in Visegrad group (Czech Rep, Hungary, Slovakia and Poland).

2016

Autumn 2016

Title: A decomposition of the business model of UberTaxi: a case of digital economy
By: Professor Darek M Haftor & Dr Christine van Burken, Department of Informatics
When: Thursday 8 September 2016 at 2.00-3.00 pm
Where: Room D1143, building D, Växjö; Room Ny400, Kalmar nyckel, Kalmar

Title: Learning from a failed experimental study: The effect of IT complementarities on software programmers' productivity
By: Doctoral Student Natallia Pashkevich, Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University
When: Thursday 20 October 2016 at 2.00-3.00 pm
Where: Room B2018, building B, Växjö; Room Ny400, Kalmar nyckel, Kalmar

Title: Digitalization of a local newspaper: a case study (preliminary)
By: Doctoral Student Erdelina Kurti, Department of Informatics
When: Thursday 10 November 2016 at 1.00-3.00 pm
Where: Room B2018, building B, Växjö

Title: Value creation from the interaction between business models themes and product market strategies in digital businesses
By: Doctoral Student Andreas Koczkas, Department of Informatics
When: Thursday 17 November 2016 at 11.00-12.00 am
Where: Room B2018, building B, Växjö; Room Ny400, Kalmar nyckel, Kalmar

Title: IT business value: From IT governance to business performance
By: Doctoral Student Fakhreddin Rad, Department of Informatics
When
: Thursday 17 November 2016 at 1.00-4.00 pm
Where
: Room N2052, building N, Växjö

Title: Transforming into digital business: the role of cognitive dominant logic (preliminary)
By: Doctoral Student Erdelina Kurti, Department of Informatics
When
: Thursday 8 December 2016 at 1.00-3.00 pm
Where: Room B2034, building B, Växjö

Title: Strategy translation and digital transformation: building a framework for measuring digitalisation of businesses in a regional context
By: Associate Professor Krister Bredmar & Dr John Jeansson, School of Business and Economics
When
: Friday 9 December 2016 at 2.00-3.00 pm
Where: Room B2018, building B, Växjö; Room Ny300, Kalmar nyckel, Kalmar

Spring 2016

Title: Commercializing technology for elderly – part I
By: Dr Rana Mostaghel, School of Business and Economics
When: Friday 5 February 2016 at 10:00–12:00 am
Where: Kalmar Ny300, Växjö F303

Title: Digitalisation of business models: some heuristics
By: Professor Dr Darek M Haftor, Department of Informatics
When: Friday 4 March 2016 at 10:00–12:00 am
Where: Kalmar Ny300, Växjö F303

Title: Cognitive dominant logic as a conditioner of the transformation from non-digital into digital business model: a case of library transformation
By: Doctoral Candidate Mrs Erdelina Kurti, Department of Informatics
Title: The anthropocene and the digital
By: Associate Professor Martin Gren, School of Business and Economics
When: Friday 1 April 2016 at 10:00–12:00 am
Where: Kalmar Ny300, Växjö F303

Title: Creating and capturing value through digitalisation: a value scape perspective
By: Dr John Jeansson, School of Business and Economics
When: Friday 13 May 2016 at 10:00–12:00 am
Where: Kalmar Ny300, Växjö F303

2015

Autumn 2015

Title: E-commerce consumers' perception of return policy fairness and purchase intention
By: Dr Pejvak Oghazi, School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University
When: Thursday 22 October 2015 at 1.15–3 pm
Where: Room B3033, Växjö

Title: Strategic ecosystem-driven R&D management
By: Dr Helena Holmström Olsson, Associate Professor at the Department of Computer Science, Malmö University
When: Thursday 12 November at 10.15–12 am
Where: Room B3033, Växjö

Title: A critical appraisal of the principles for critical information systems research
By: Professor Emeritus Sytse Strijbos, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, the Netherlands, and Professor Darek Haftor, Department of Informatics, Linnaeus University
When: Thursday 10 December 2015 at 1.15–3 pm
Where: Room D1153, Växjö

Spring 2015

Title: An approach to the conception of network-based operations enabled by information and communication technologies
By: Dr Christine van Burken, postdoctoral researcher, Linnaeus University
When: Thursday 29 January 2015 at 10.00–12.00 am
Where: D2270, Växjö

Title: The structure and dynamics of information workers in Nordic countries: a proposed research model
By: Dr Olga Pashkevich, postdoctoral researcher & Professor Darek M Haftor,
Linnaeus University
When: Thursday 5 February 2015 at 1.00–3.00 pm
Where: B3033, Växjö

Title: Revenue models for digital business
By: Associate Professor Nils-Göran Olve, Linköping University & Uppsala University
When: Thursday 19 February 2015 at 10.00–12.00 am
Where: B3033, Växjö

Title: The e-transit study: exploring SME channel expansions
By: Dr Siw Lundqvist, Dr John Jeansson and Dr Leif Marcusson, Linnaeus University
When: Thursday 12 March 2015 at 10.00–12.00 am
Where: B2034, Växjö

Title: Ethics of digital information use: current research frontiers
By: Dr Christine van Burken, postdoctoral researcher, Linnaeus University
When: Thursday 19 March 2015 at 10.00–12.00 am
Where: B3033, Växjö

Title: Factors that shape successful business model adaptation: from traditional to digital business models – a research proposal
By: Mrs Erdelina Kurti (MSc, PhD candidate), Department of Informatics,
Linnaeus University
Opponents: Dr Christian Sandström, Associate Professor, Chalmers, and Dr Jan Aidemark, Senior Lecturer, Linnaeus University
When: Thursday 9 April 2015 at 10.00–12.00 am
Where: D1140, Växjö

Title: Digital Supply Chains
By: Dr Rana Mostaghel, Linnaeus University
When: Thursday 23 April 2015 at 10.00–13.00 am
Where: B3033, Växjö

Title: The structure and dynamics of information workers in Sweden: some empirical evidences
By: Dr Olga Pashkevich, postdoctoral researcher, Linnaeus University
When: Thursday 21 May 2015 at 10.00–13.00 am
Where: B3033, Växjö

2014

Autumn 2014

Title: On building information modelling: an explorative study
By: Dr Erika Johansson, Chalmers University of Technology, Professor Jan Rosvall, Göteborg University, Professor Darek M Haftor, Linnaeus University, and Professor Bengt Magnusson, Linnaeus University
Language: Swedish
When: 8 October 2014 at 9–12 am
Where: H1411V_F_32_Hus H

Title: Argumentation and meaning of concepts: an empirical semantics approach
By: Associate Professor Anders Person, Luleå University of Technology
When:
- Day 1: Wednesday 29 October 2014 at 10.00–16.00
- Day 2: Thursday 30 October 2014 at 09.00–15.00
Where: B2034, Växjö

Title: Digital business models
By: Dr Christian Sandström, Chalmers University of Technology & the Ratio Institute
When: Tuesday 18 November 2014 at 10.00–12.00
Where: D2270A, Växjö

Title: A research model for assessment of IT user productivity – a proposal
By: Miss Natallia Pashkevich, PhD candidate, Stockholm Business School
When: Thursday 20 November 2014 at 10.00–12.00
Where: B2034, Växjö

Title: Beyond IT and productivity
By: Professor Eremitus Birger Rapp, Linköping University
When: Thursday 20 November 2014 13.00–15.00
Where: B2034, Växjö

Title: Information Theory as a foundation for the governance of operations
By: Associate Professor Fabian von Schéele & Professor Darek M Haftor, Linnaeus University
When: Thursday 11 December 2014 at 10.00–12.00
Where: B2034, Växjö

Spring 2014

Title: Cognitive Times Distortion and the Profit Equation
By: Associate Professor Fabian von Schéele & Professor Darek M Haftor, Linnaeus University
When: February 13 2014 at 10–12
Where: B3033, Växjö

Title: Conditions for successful Information Sharing
By: Dr Miranda Kajtazi, Linnaeus University
When: March 13 2014
Where: B3033, Växjö

Title: Digital Business Models workshop: research overview
By: Professor Darek M Haftor, Linnaeus University
When: March 19–20 2014

2013

Autumn 2013

Title: Making sense of the digital business research program
By: Professor Darek M Haftor, Linnaeus University
When: Thursday 11 September 2013 at 10–12
Where: D6730

Title: De-materialization
By: Dr Niclas Eberhagen, Linnaeus University
When: Thursday 12 September 2013 at 10–12
Where: D6730

Title: Research program on e-Commerce
By: Professor Izak Benbazat, Sauder School of Business, University of British Colombia, Canada
When: Wednesday 18 September 2013 at 13–15
Where: D1136, Växjö

Title: Doctoral dissertation defense
By: Mrs Miranda Kajtazi, PhD candidate
When: Thursday 19 September 2013 at 13–16
Where: Weber, M building. Växjö

Title: How to publish in good journals
By: Professor Izak Benbasat, Sauder School of Business, University of British Colombia, Canada
When: Friday 20 September 2013 at 10.30–12.00
Where: D2272, Växjö

Title: Profit equation adjusted for cognitive time distortion: when time is the key cots in information production and consumption
By: Associate Professor Fabian von Schéele & Professor Darek M Haftor, Linnaeus University
When: Thursday 12 December 2013 at 13–15
Where: D2272, Växjö

Ongoing research projects

IT-enabled Productivity

This research focuses on how information and communication technologies may be used in organizations to contribute to productivity gains. The novelty of this research stems from its focus on the nano-level (rather than macro, meso, or micro) where individual tasks and workers are studied. A second innovation here is the systemic approach where a so-called complementarity is assumed, which postulates that a set of different factors (IT, human capital, and organizational capital) must be synchronized in a specific manner to produce the desired outcome, here productivity. The expected research results may serve as a guide for the design of organizations and their operations with regard to IT-use and productivity aspirations.

Details of this study may be found in

  • Pashkevich, N., Haftor, D.M. (2014). A Search for Patterns of Effective IT-Use at the Individual Level: A Complementarity Theory-Based Approach. Presented at the North American Productivity Workshop VIII, June 4th – 7th Ottawa, Canada.

Research team

  • Miss Natallia Pashkevich, Doctoral Student (in cooperation with Stockholm Business School, Stockholm University)
  • Professor Darek M Haftor, Research Leader

Implications of Cognitive Time Distortion on Information Economics

This research recognizes the empirical insight that a key resource, and thus cost, of contemporary information production and consumption is human time; this is so as other conventional resources may be bypassed by digitalized production and consumption. A second key insight is the empirical phenomenon of cognitive time distortion, which accounts for the difference between physical or clock time and psychic or cognitive time. This gap or distortion is unconditional to all human beings, meaning that all economic organizations leak time and therefore manifest inefficacies due to their respective time distortions. The consequent studies here have modified the orthodox functions of costs, revenues and profit by accounting for cognitive time distortion; a second model developed is the so-called workload equation that accounts for needed working time of human actors, where cognitive time distortion is incorporated and related to the economic performance of human actors. Other related elaborations include an incorporation of cognitive time distortion into productivity, risk management, project management, and pricing, among others. The results produced in this research stream may have crucial implications for both managers of digital businesses and policy makers for information economy regulations.

Details of this study may be found in

Research team

  • Associate Professor Fabian von Schéele
  • Professor Darek M Haftor

Exploration of Nordic Information Economy

The massive adoption of various kinds of information and communication technologies by all kinds of businesses has given rise to a distinction between information products and workers versus material products and workers. This in turn has established the so-called information economy, which accounts for all information production and consumption in an economy. The newly-emerged information economy seems to manifest somewhat different characteristics compared to the conventional economic wisdom derived from the industrial age – e.g. elimination of marginal costs, strong network effects, emergence of informal markets, and various job substitution effects. Several studies have characterized the US information economy, yet no dedicated studies have been conducted to characterize and understand the information economy present in the four Nordic countries: Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland. This project attempts that task. The outcome of this project may potentially inform managers about the new economic context for their businesses and its implications also provide recommendations for economic policy makers.

Research team

  • Dr Vohla Pashkevich, Postdoc Researcher
  • Professor Darek M Haftor, Research Leader

Ethics of Digital Business

Due to the increased use of modern information and communication technologies, contemporary businesses face new kinds of situations, never previously experienced, that pose moral challenges for managerial decision-making. For example: many consumer product firms possess proprietary customer information, generated by numerous customer interactions. Such customer information is stored in a digitalized form and can easily be manipulated and transferred. While customers have from a legal point of view typically given their consent to allow the company to use that information; novel and unorthodox use of such information may still upset customers. Therefore, questions have emerged as to the boundaries between what can and cannot be done with such digital information. This research aims to formulate underlying principles to guide managerial decision-making with regard to the use of digital information by businesses.

Research team

  • Dr Christine van Burken, Postdoc Researcher
  • Professor Darek M Haftor, Research Leader

From Non-digital to Digital Business Models: the Inherent Cognitive Path Dependencies

Many traditional businesses have experienced losses of market share due to the emergence of digital businesses, which motivates their decisions to move from non-digital to digital business models. Yet experience shows that few such transformations succeed; the question addressed is why this should be. What are the key hinders and what are the key success factors in the transformation from non-digital into digital business models? The assumed focus of this research is the role of cognitive path dependencies (e.g. managerial experience and organizational habits) that limit and facilitate such transformations. This is particularly relevant as non-digital businesses function in terms of conventional economic wisdom while digital business models function within the economics of digital information, e.g. elimination of marginal costs, significance of network effects, new revenue models, etc. The outcome of this research stream aims to provide managers with information about the key hinders and key success factors when transforming a non-digital business model into a digital business model.

Details of this study may be found in

  • Kurti, E., Haftor D.M. (2014). The Role of Path Dependence in the Business Model Adaptation: From Traditional to Digital Business Models. Proceedings of the Mediterranean Conference on Information Systems (MCIS 2014). Paper 28. Verona, Italy. URL: http://aisel.aisnet.org/mcis2014/28

Research team

  • Miss Erdelina Kurti, Doctoral Student
  • Professor Darek M Haftor, Research Leader

Digital Business Model Configurations

One of the central characteristics of a digital business model is its ability to establish networks between a set of actors (organizations and people) that are mediated by information and communication technologies; for example the streaming music distribution firm Spotify links digitally and directly between music consumers and the music producers, thereby bypassing conventional music outlets, whether based on DVD or file downloads; Spotify also links with Facebook to establish playlist sharing by listeners and thereby adding to its lock-in mechanism. This research focuses on understanding a firm's ability to freely establish a novel actor network by means of ICT-mediation to realize its digital business model. More specifically, what are the conditions that enable and hinder actor-network transformations by means of ICT links, whether they be customized or standardized? The research results aimed for here may potentially inform managers about strategic decisions for the establishment of IT-mediated actor networks, their advantages and challenges, and thereby contribute to a successful digital business model evolution.

Research team

  • Mr Behrooz Golshan, Doctoral Student
  • Professor Darek M Haftor, Research Leader

Business Models and Product Market Strategies

Previous research has shown that a key source of economic value creation in businesses are the products that are offered in their market places, and that products may assumed a so-called generic product market strategy, such as cost-leadership or differentiation, but also timing of market entry and customer-segment targeting. More recent research has shown that a firm's business model, to be distinguished from its product market strategy, also constitutes a distinct source of economic value creation, where four sources have been proposed: novelty, effectivity, complementarity and lock-in. As far as we know it, only one study has tested relations that provide superior economic performance in term of the relations between a specific product market strategy and a specific business model theme. The present research project attempts to further advance our knowledge in this regard, by testing several other combinations of product market strategies and business model themes, focusing on digital businesses. Any uncovered new patterns of combinations between product market strategy and business model theme may offer guidance for the strategy formulation for digital business.

Research team

  • Mr Andreas Koczkas, Doctoral Student
  • Professor Darek M Haftor

Toward A Post Systemic Conception of Digital Business

Conceptions of complex phenomena, such as social organizations and networks of such organizations, more and more frequently rest upon an explicit or implicit notion of a 'system', and 'system-of-systems'. A key defining feature of a system is its systemic behavior, or as Aristotle put it: the whole is more than the sum of its parts. The contemporary notion of a 'system' has its main root in the studies of living phenomena, and has been a useful root metaphor for the conception of complexities in terms of a system's components and their interactions, giving rise to functions and transformations, making it possible to adapt to an environment, where systems interact in a novel manner. While a system-based conception of complexities has its merits, there also are important limitations that potentially lead to a reductionist conception of a complex phenomenon such as a business model. This theoretical exploration seeks alternative conceptual foundations that can do more justice to our experiences of the complexities inherent in contemporary digital business models; in the latter instance machines, people, organizations and society interact in a never-before experienced manner, which sometimes gives rise to dramatic perplexities, such as in the recent case of Uber Taxi.

Details of this study may be found in

  • Kurti, E., Haftor D.M. (2014). Toward Post Systems Thinking in the Conception of Whole-Part Relations. Presented at the 19th Annual Working Conference of the International Institute for Development and Ethics, May, 2014, Maarssen, The Netherlands.
  • Haftor D.M., Koczkas, A. (2015). Two Limitations of the Systemic Conception of a Business Model. Presented at the Business Systems Laboratory 3rd International Symposium: Advances in Business Management Toward Systemic Approach. Universitá per Stranieri di Perugia, Perugia, Italy, January 21-23, 2015.

Research team

  • Professor Darek M Haftor, Research Leader
  • Several associates

Critical Scrutiny of Digitalization

The rapid digitalization of our societies, manifested by the dramatic development and adoption of new information and communication technologies (ICT), can be observed in most parts of societies: large and small businesses, central and local governments, public and private health care organizations, citizens at home, both in the developed and the developing countries. This process of digitalization of human, social, industrial, military and public affairs seems to be driven by at least two underlying factors: productivity gains and a search for innovations. Digitalization has brought and will bring us many positive benefits; one illustrative case is the M-Pesa (stands for mobile money in Swahili). It is a mobile-phone based money transfer and micro-financing service, operating in Kenya, Tanzania, Afghanistan and India, among others; M-Pesa does not only provide people with financial services that were absent, it enables commercial activities that give rise to work and jobs and therefore and economic development. ICT is also capable of producing effects that are not desired, though. An illustration of this is the recent advent of the American firm Uber Taxi that has created significant social unrest outside US and also given rise to various institutional reactions. While the underlying economic drivers behind digitalization of businesses are important for wealth creation in our societies, the position assumed here is that it is important not to reduce the justification of all digitalization to such monolithic drivers alone. To this end, this research effort addresses the question of how to critically scrutinize both the processes and the results of the digitalization of businesses. As the majority of critical social thought is typically based either upon the Frankfurt school of Critical social theory, or various postmodern social conceptions, such as the one of Michel Foucault, this exploration has adopted Herman Dooyeweerd's Cosmonomic philosophy as a central intellectual foundation. Unlike other current critical approaches to social thought that are founded on Kantian dichotomy of theoretical and practical reason, this effort recognizes that a truly critical attitude does not start in the human logos but in her conviction and thus faith. A novel model for a critical scrutiny has been advanced here and its further development and application is an ongoing effort. The aimed result is a novel critical conceptualization of digitalization that unearths hidden presuppositions and social asymmetries, which may inform various policy makers.

Details of this study may be found in

  • Eriksson, D.M. (2003). An Identification of Normative Sources for Systems Thinking: an Inquiry into Religious Ground-Motives for Systems Thinking paradigms. Systems Research & Behavioral Science, Vol.20, No. 6, pp. 475-487. URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/sres.579/abstract
  • Strijbos, S., Basden, A. eds. (2006). In Search for an Integrative Vision for Technology: Interdisciplinary Studies in Information Systems. Springer

Research team

  • Professor Darek M Haftor, Research Leader
  • Professor Sytse Strijbos, Guest Professor
  • Dr Christine van Burken, Postdoc Researcher

Finalized research projects

Project Management: Demands on IT Project Managers

What competence is in demand regarding project managers for IT projects? How do demands from employers change over time? These are central topics in a research project on the project manager profession. The project analyses 325 job advertisements for project managers for IT projects, from the Swedish Public Employment Service and from the magazine Computer Sweden, published from 2010–2013. The aim was to find out what competence, experience, personal skills, and requirements for certification that was in demand for project managers for IT projects. Included in the study is also a comparison between the requirements for project managers for IT projects, other project managers, and other professions.

Details of this study may be found in

  • Lundqvist, S. and Marcusson, L. (2015). Apply a project core view to promote project success. Journal of Modern Project Management, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 100-109.
  • S. Lundqvist and L. Marcusson, (2014). Advertisements for ICT project managers show diversity between Swedish employers' and project management associations' views of PM certifications. Problems of management in the 21st Century, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 35-55.
  • Marcusson, L. and Lundqvist, S. (2015). Applying a core competence model on Swedish job advertisements for IT project managers. International Journal of Information Technology Project Management, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 1-17.
  • Marcusson, L. and Lundqvist, S. (forthcoming 2016). Why advertise the obvious? Learning outcomes from analyzing advertisements for recruitment of Swedish IS/IT project managers. International Journal of Information Systems and Project Management.

Research team

  • Dr Siw Lundqvist, Linnaeus University
  • Dr Leif Marcusson, Linnaeus University

E-commerce: From Physical Commerce to E-commerce

E-commerce has grown rapidly in the last few years. Many companies aim to expand their activities from physical commerce in stores to e-commerce. At the same time, there are those working with e-commerce who also opens up physical stores. The project "E-transit" investigates what business models are used for the transition between physical store and e-commerce, and how to manage the transition from one channel to another as smoothly as possible. The project studies 40 different companies with experience from the field. The idea is that the research should result in a manual listing experience and providing advice to companies that plan to begin with e-commerce.

Details of this study may be found in

  • Understanding Online Channel Expansion in an SME Context: A Business Model Perspective.

Research team

  • Professor Rune Gustavsson, Guest Professor, Linnaeus University
  • Dr John Jeansson, Linnaeus University
  • Dr Siw Lundqvist, Linnaeus University
  • Dr Leif Marcusson, Linnaeus University
  • Dr Shahrokh Nikou, Associate Professor, Åbo Akademi University
  • Dr Anna Sell, Åbo Akademi University
  • Professor Pirkko Walden, Åbo Akademi University

Unauthorized Information Provision

This study produced a novel understanding of how escalation of a task-commitment makes employees provide unauthorized information to other individuals. Based on comprehensive empirical studies in two highly regulated industries – pharmaceuticals and banking – surveyed both in Northern and Southern Europe, the study found that the majority of professionals tend to disclose sensitive information when in a situation that requires unauthorized information sharing if a crucial work assignment is to be finalized. This result supports the insight that it is not enough to only invest in modern information and communication technologies to establish successful information security; rather that there also is a need to establish a set of complementary factors both at the level of an individual and at organizational level. The knowledge produced here may be used to guide the design of information security policies in organizations aimed at preventing undesired sharing of information by employees.

Details of this study may be found in

  • Kajtazi, M. (2013). Assessing Escalation of Commitment as an Antecedent of Noncompliance with Information Security Policy. Doctoral Diss. Växjö: Linnaeus University Press.
  • Kajtazi, M. Cavusoglu, H, Benbasat, I., Haftor, D. (2013). Assessing Self-Justification as an Antecedent of Noncompliance with Information Security Policies. Information Systems: Transforming the Future: 24th Australasian Conference of Information Systems, 4-6 December, 2014.

Information Inadequacy

The first of its kind, this study analyzed more than 50 cases where necessary information had not been provided in time. The study identified a set of factors that hindered successful information provision, for example in emergency situations, such as the Tsunami disaster in South-East Asia 2004. The identified hindrance factors ranged from malfunctioning technology, operational procedures and standards, through limitations in individuals' cognitions and skills, to socio-cultural and political structures where information was both passively and actively hindered. These results support the insights that it is not enough to merely invest in information and communication technologies to establish successful information sharing; rather that there also is a need to establish a set of individual and organizational factors to complement ICT investments. The identified hindrance factors may guide the design of organizations and their operations so that information provision is successful!

Details of this study may be found in

  • Kajtazi, M., Haftor D.M., Mirijamdotter, A. (2011). Information Inadequacy: Some Causes of Failures in Human and Social Affairs. Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation, 14, 63-72.
  • Kajtazi, M. (2011). An Exploration of Information Inadequacy: Instances that Cause the Lack of Needed Information. Licentiate Diss. Växjö: Linnaeus University.

Partners and sponsors

It is of utmost importance that all the research conducted by the Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business manifests high relevance for firms, their survival and success, citizens, non-profit organizations, as well as policy makers.

Therefore, the assumed research program, with its portfolio of research projects, was formulated in close cooperation with a number of organizations, to represent their concerns and needs. The majority of research projects conducted have one or more industrial partners.

By means of the close relations with industry and other stakeholders, the majority of research conducted is financially supported by external bodies. Currently, the following organizations are the main supporters:

The Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business is constantly open for and actively seeking new partner engagements aimed at new innovative research and knowledge constitution.

About Gunilla Bradley

The Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business is named after Dr Gunilla Bradley, Professor Emerita at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm.

This naming is a celebration of Dr Bradley's pioneering research achievements, including her studies of the digitalization of workplaces conducted in the 1970's. Professor Bradley has produced numerous research books and articles dealing with the effects of digital technologies adoption, more lately summarised in the so-called 'Convergence Model'. Her scholarly contributions have been recognised with several important awards, including the Namur Award from the International Federation for Information Processing (IFIP).

Currently, Professor Bradley's key concern is moral, namely how to utilize digital technologies to develop peace, democracy, and human wellbeing. Dr Bradley was born in Högsby, a small town in the region of Småland, which is also the region of Linnaeus University.

More information about Professor Gunilla Bradley may be found at Gunillabradley.se.

Staff & contact

Contact

Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business is always seeking new collaborations, both with organizations in need of advice and research partnerships and with other academic institutions.

For further dialogue, please contact:

  • Centre Director: Dr Darek M Haftor, Professor at Linnaeus University
  • Associate Director: Dr Siw Lundqvist, Senior Lecturer at Linnaeus University

Governance

Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business is governed by its Centre Governance Team, which includes four Directors, as follows.

  • Centre Director: Dr Darek M Haftor, Professor at Linnaeus University, is the funding director, holding the overall Centre responsibility and specifically focusing on its research policy
  • Associate Director: Dr Pejvak Oghazi, Senior Lecturer at Linnaeus University, is responsible for the Centre research funding
  • Associate Director: Dr Siw Lundqvist, Senior Lecturer at Linnaeus University, is responsible for the Centre communication
  • Associate Director: Dr John Jeansson, Senior Lecturer at Linnaeus University, is responsible for the Centre operations

The group and its people

The following researchers at Linnaeus University form the Gunilla Bradley Centre for Digital Business.

Professor Darek M Haftor, Centre Director

  • Information economics
  • Digital business models
  • Systems thinking for management
  • Critical scrutiny of digitalization

Professor Anita Mirijamdotter, Senior Research Fellow

  • Design and management of dynamic organizational systems and learning environments
  • ICT impact on organizational processes
  • Interactive and human centric methods or inquiring, evaluating, valuing and learning
  • Library organization transitions

Professor Bengt Magnusson, Adjunct Professor, Senior Research Fellow

  • Building technology
  • CAD/BIM

Professor Sytse Strijbos, Guest Professor, Senior Research Fellow

  • Critical scrutiny of digitalization

Associate Professor Fabian von Schéele, Non-resident Senior Research Fellow

  • The nature and function of time in information economy and businesses

Associate Professor Krister Bredmar, Senior Research Fellow

  • Performance measurement and management
  • Management control
  • Digitalized business models

Dr Annelie Ekelin, Senior Research Fellow

  • Media and communication science
  • e-government
  • e-participation
  • Innovation from a human rights perspective
  • Social media
  • ICT development

Dr John Jeansson, Senior Research Fellow

  • Business informatics
  • e-commerce and the digital enterprise
  • Business models, digitalisation and competitive advantage
  • Information systems benefits management and value creation

Dr Siw Lundqvist, Senior Research Fellow

  • Project management
  • Organizational change
  • Mergers
  • Digital business
  • Gamification

Dr Leif Marcusson, Senior Research Fellow

  • Project management
  • Organizational development
  • Decision making
  • Digital business
  • Gamification

Dr Rana Mostaghel, Senior Research Fellow

  • Service marketing
  • Innovation
  • Supply chain management
  • e-commerce

Dr Pejvak Oghazi, Senior Research Fellow

  • Supply chain management
  • E-commerce and retail management
  • Innovation
  • Marketing communication
  • International marketing

Dr Christine Boshuijzen van Burken, Non-resident Postdoc Researcher

  • The ethics of digital business models

Dr Volha Pashkevich, Non-resident Postdoc Researcher

  • The structure and dynamics of information economy

Mrs Erdelina Kurti, Doctoral Student

  • The nature of transformation from non-digital into digital business models

Dr Natallia Pashkevich, Postdoc Researcher

  • Conditions that govern the productivity of workers that use digital technology
  • Conditions that govern the productivity of industrial machines
  • Information economy analysis

Dr Soumitra Chowdhury, Postdoc Researcher

  • Conceptualizing the underlying premises for services in digitalized industrial machines
  • Designing services for industrial machines
  • Designing business models for services.

Mr Behrooz Golshan, Doctoral Student

  • The configuration of digital business models

Mr Andreas Koczkas, Doctoral Student

  • Digital business models driven by non-monetary incentives and rewards

Mr Håkan Sterner, Doctoral Student

  • The inter-actor competence provision in digital business models

Mr Fakhreddin Fakhrai Rad, Doctoral Student

  • The digitalization of supply chains

Mr Sina Mortazavi, Non-resident Researcher Assistant

  • Digitalization of supply chains
  • Business ecosystems
  • International marketing.

Dr Stefan Fraenkel, Non-resident Senior Research Fellow

  • How digital technologies create economic value in health care and the pharmaceutical industry

In addition, we currently have the following alumni research staff:

Dr Miranda Kajtazi

Was a Doctoral Student and founding contributor to the emergence of the Linnaeus Digital Business Research Initiative; she is now conducting research elsewhere, targeting information security.

Dr Niclas Eberhagen

Was a Postdoc Researcher and is now Senior Lecturer at Linnaeus University.