Salary review

A good salary structure is linked to operations, and can thereby contribute towards the success of Linnaeus University’s skills supply – a requirement for the success of the university’s operations in the long and short terms.

Salary review refers to a review of every employee’s salary. Salary reviews are normally conducted annually, but there may be exceptions to this rule.A good salary structure is linked to operations, and can thereby contribute towards the success of Linnaeus University’s skills supply – a requirement for the success of the university’s operations in the long and short terms.

Salary reviews are based on central agreements between labour market parties.

RALS (Framework agreement regarding salaries etc. for employees in the public sector) is an agreement between the Swedish Agency for Government Employers and the central employee unions. There has been a permanent agreement with Saco-S since 2010, while temporary agreements have been struck with OFR and SEKO, spanning 1-3 years at a time.

The parties in a LNU salary review are:

  • the employer, i.e. the manager setting the salaries and the employer’s negotiating delegation from the Office of Human Resources.
  • the local employee unions Saco-S, OFR/S, which include ST and Lärarförbundet - the Swedish Teachers’ Union, among others, as well as SEKO’s local negotiating delegation.

The salary review is conducted based on LNU’s salary policy and any salary criteria determined for a specific part of the organisation.

The salary dialogue is a basis for setting a new salary. The manager and the employee discuss salary criteria and the expected performances for these during the set period (1 October – 30 September). A salary dialogue  between the manager and the employee takes place regardless of which employee union the employee belongs to.   

During a salary review, the process for setting a new salary varies  depending on which employee union the employee belongs to. For example, a new salary may be set through a salary-setting dialogue resulting in an agreement between said manager and employee. Another option is that the employer and the employee union negotiate to determine a new salary, known as collective negotiations. For more information about which process is applicable to you, contact your employee union. If you are not attached to any employee union, contact your manager or the Office of Human Resources for information about which process is applicable to you.

In October 2019, the vice-chancellor decided on a new revised wage policy and new salary criteria. There are now three common salary criteria as well as specialised salary criteria for different staff categories and the wage policy also emphasises the need for dialogue and anchoring in our activities.