Other information

Linnaeus University is a modern, international university. It's inspired by Carl Linnaeus, with roots in Småland and the world as its stage. It is the spirit of the scientist, entrepreneur, and pedagogue Linnaeus that makes up the foundation at Linnaeus University.


The university's logotype is made up of a stylised tree. The original is a drawing by Carl von Linnaeus in his book of herbs and plants. The symbol conveys both the connection to the name and the roots in the soil of the Småland region of southern Sweden. At the same time, the tree may be seen as a symbol for the month of May and for growth and vitality, a symbol, which agrees well with the university's ambition to be a global university with the region as its base and the world as its stage.

At Linnaeus University there are approximately 2,000 employees and approximately 35,000 students. The university has two campuses, one located in Kalmar and one in Växjö.

At Linnaeus University we want to enable you to grow as a person. The learning environment is characterised by an active student life with teaching and research staff in close proximity to students. Many of our international students mention the informal relationships with the teachers as one of the things they appreciate most as students at Linnaeus University. Other aspects that receive praise are the modern and environmentally-friendly buildings, easy and widespread access to computers and other equipment, good connections with businesses and organisations in the area, and the reality-based case studies that add a real-life dimension to the studies.

Furthermore, Linnaeus University is known for its strong international profile. The university is extensively involved in international exchange programmes involving undergraduate and doctoral students as well as teaching staff, with more than 500 partner universities in over 50 countries. Every year, approximately 1,700 international students (exchange and non-exchange) come from Africa, Asia, Australia, North America, South America, Scandinavia, and other parts of Europe to study at Linnaeus University, whereas around 350 Swedish students from Linnaeus University travel abroad. The university actively participates in exchange programmes such as Nordplus, Erasmus, ISEP, and USAC and also has a large number of bilateral exchange agreements. The first programme offered in English was established more than two decades ago. Today, international students, along with Swedish students, study in English and other languages at every faculty at Linnaeus University. International students at Linnaeus University can study at both undergraduate and graduate level. Research and development projects are undertaken in a variety of fields and usually include a significant international component.

Life in Sweden

Facts and Figures
Area: 450,000 km2
Longest North-South distance: 1,574 km
Longest East-West distance: 499 km
Population: 10 million inhabitants Capital: Stockholm
Currency: 1 krona (SEK) = 100 öre. 1 Euro is approx. 9.5 Swedish Crowns (2017)
Religion: 82 % belong to the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Sweden
Constitution: Unitary Parliamentary Constitutional Monarchy

Sweden is said to be among the top five countries in the world in terms of democracy, safety and gender equality. The Swedish lifestyle brings together a love of nature, good housing, environmental thinking and lots of culture – all tied up with awareness of health and a strong sense of equality.

Sweden has succeeded in creating a balance between social equality and economic success. Education is free, healthcare is cheap, childcare is universal and the streets are clean. The driving forces behind "the Swedish model" were the Social Democratic Party and the trade unions, although it has its roots in the 19th century when "poor relief laws" were passed. The Swedish model is still alive, if not as all-encompassing as it once was. There is greater privatisation in the healthcare sector and the number of private schools is growing rapidly. But not even parties on the right side of the political spectrum talk of dismantling the welfare state, as Swedish voters would simply not stand for it. The Swedish lifestyle varies greatly with the seasons. During the darker winter months you can enjoy evenings in the cinema, and winter sports during the day. In spring and summer, life is lived outdoors: music festivals, outdoor theatres and open-air museums are popular.

You can find more information about Sweden on the official site of Sweden.
See more of Sweden in this official film made by The Swedish Institute.

Traditions and Holidays
Easter – Påsk: Easter is primarily a family holiday. Children dress up as "Easter witches" and pay visits to their neighbours asking for sweets, giving a drawing in return. Good Friday, Easter Sunday and Easter Monday are national holidays.
Walpurgis Eve – Valborgsmässoafton (April 30): In the evening of April 30, Swedes welcome spring by lighting bonfires and listening to choirs singing traditional songs. Speeches are delivered to greet the arrival of spring. For students this is a big party night.
Midsummer – Midsommar: Late in June when nights are at their shortest, Midsummer is celebrated. This is one of the biggest, and certainly most popular, Swedish holidays. In the afternoon the maypole is raised and people dance around it. The menu offers marinated herring (raw fish), fresh potatoes, strawberries and snaps. According to tradition, unmarried girls pick seven different kinds of flowers; put them under their pillows and dream of their husbands-to-be.
Crayfish season – Kräftsäsongen (middle of August): The second Wednesday of August marks the beginning of the Crayfish season. This is celebrated with outdoor parties illuminated with colourful lanterns and silly hats (even though today most people buy their crayfish deep-frozen).
Lucia – Lucia (December 13) Lucia was an Italian saint whose memorial day is celebrated in Sweden on December 13. Lucia is supposed to bring light in the very darkest period of the year.
Christmas – Jul (December 24–26): Even before Christianity was introduced in Sweden, there was a celebration of the winter solstice. Today Christmas is an important holiday. Most people have time off from work or school for at least one or two weeks. The peak of the celebration is on December 24 when families eat traditional food, gather around the Christmas tree, and children wait for Santa Claus to bring Christmas presents.


The region Kalmar and Växjö

Kalmar
In this city's unique historical environment, you always find something to do. Almost everywhere in the city of Kalmar you are reminded of the importance the city once had in its historic past. There are many historical landmarks and sparsely-renovated buildings, in which there are now charming stores, restaurants and pubs. With its architecture, its stone houses, dikes and cobblestone streets, Kalmar has preserved the memory of a time in 'Great power', and it is combined with numerous parks. The central parts of the city are characterised by old buildings and new construction adapted to the old environment. One of the outstanding features of this little town is the closeness to the sea, and if that is not exciting enough, we have our own castle in which many secrets still are to be revealed.

Kalmar castle is the best-preserved Renaissance castle in Scandinavia, and fascinating exhibitions and historical activities takes place here for visitors of all ages. Right next to the castle, Kalmar has its City Park. "Kalmar's green drawing room" has the characteristics of a romantic English park, where the design is patterned after the nature. Soft lines with an abundance of trees and bushes give the park alternating open and closed spaces, embedded with both light and shadowy sections to explore. There are museums all over Kalmar, which display the diversity of its inhabitants.

The Kalmar art museum displays temporary art history exhibitions and contemporary art with both regional and national perspectives, but international art as well. There is also the Kalmar Maritime Museum that holds thousands of nautical artefacts, ship models paintings and exotic objects from near and far. The museum tells the tale of a life at sea, with an authentic atmosphere of a small, traditional maritime museum. One of the few unaltered buildings from Sweden's period as a great power is the cathedral.

Kalmar cathedral has three church bells, all from the 17th century, the chancel's floor consists of tombstones from the 17th or 18th century, and many of them have a great artistic value. When it comes to shopping there is everything from well-known chain stores to small and cosy shops.
Kvarnholmen, located in the city centre offers stores for you to discover, all in walking distance. If you do not find what you are looking for here, take a stroll down to Baronen Shopping Centre, located next to the guest harbour and find even more stores. Besides these two large shopping environments, you can also take a bus ride to Hansa City, where you find another shopping centre, and, of course, Ikea.

When in Kalmar, why not take a walk in the central sections of the city, have a traditional Swedish "fika", grab a coffee and maybe a piece of cake in one of the coffee shops or cafes. Or try the food offered in one of the many restaurants. In the evening, after a long day of shopping or exploring, why not investigate the local nightlife? Kalmar offers a variety of bars and clubs.

See more of Kalmar in this official film made by Destination Kalmar.

Useful information about Kalmar
Tourist Office – You can find a tourist office at Ölandskajen 9 (next to the guest harbor).
You can also contact them on telephone: +46480-41 77 00 or by email: info@kalmar.com
Post Office – There is no post office in the center of town, but you can buy stamps at tobacconists, for example "Pressbyrån" and also in food shops.
Hospital – The hospital is situated at Lasarettsvägen 1, Telephone number +46480-81 000, webpage: ltkalmar.se
Police station – The Police station is situated at Galggatan 4, Phone number 114 14, www.polisen.se
Banks – There are several banks in the center of the town, these banks also have cash dispensers (bankomat in Swedish) but just to mention a few.
Shops – The shops in the center of town (Kvarnholmen) are usually open from 9 or 10 am until 6 pm. The shopping centre by the guest port has the address Baronen Köpcenter 12, and Giraffen's address is Polhemsgatan (both close at 7 pm on weekdays). A big shopping mall - Hansa City - is located at the outskirts of the city.
Restaurants – In Kalmar there is a multitude of restaurants to choose from and that offer a wide variety of cuisines and dishes: American, Indian, Italian, Sushi bars, Thai, Tapas bars, and Scandinavian food.
Train station – There are several daily trains to and from Kalmar connecting to Växjö, Stockholm, Gothenburg and Copenhagen. There are also train connections with Karlskrona.
The train station is situated at Stationsgatan 5. You can find more information about train trips on SJ's site.
Sport Centres – Kalmar offers a wide variety of sport activities and there are several sport centres where it is possible to workout.
Public Library – The City Library Stadsbiblioteket is open to everyone and here it is possible to find books for children and adults in various languages, newspapers, magazines, language courses, community information, music etc. Borrowing books is free of charge but you need a library ticket which is also issued free of charge. Borrowing time is usually 4 weeks. The library is open 7 days a week during winter and from Monday to Saturday during summer. It is situated at Tullslätten 4, Telephone number +46480-45 06 30.
Religious places – Many Swedes are secular or atheists but it is far from an irreligious country. Religion still plays an important cultural role. In Kalmar it is possible to find several churches and places of worship for other religions. The churches Slottskyrkan (the church within the Kalmar Castle) and Domkyrkan (at Stortorget) are well worth the visit.

Öland
The island of Öland is Sweden's smallest province. It offers a beautiful countryside, some 300 kilometres of coastline, beaches and has an amazing flora with a stunning 28 different kinds of orchids. It is connected to the mainland and Kalmar City via a long bridge. The bridge is 6,072 meters long and 36 meters high. The environment of Öland offers a variety of nature that can be seen from many long-distance footpaths or biking trails. Also, the island of sun and wind gives you the opportunity to explore art and handcrafts for all tastes. Proudly and beautifully marked by the wind, the windmills give the landscape of Öland its characteristic silhouette.
Borgholm Castle ruin is a structure that leaves no visitor unmoved. The setting is fascinating and the size of the castle overwhelming. You can wander through it and feel the echoes of history, and enjoy the view of Kalmar Strait at the same time.

If you hope to see a Swedish royalty then Solliden Palace is the place for you. Solliden is the summer resident of the Swedish royal family, and they visit it several times a year. Visitors have access to most of the parks, the café, the shop and a pavilion with exhibitions.

More nature sights on Öland is Stora Alvaret and Ottenby bird sanctuary, Långe Jan Lighthouse and Naturum centre. Stora Alvaret have been designated a world heritage site by UNESCO and is a 37 km long and 15 km wide area of barren limestone covering the southern parts of Öland. With a special flora and a large number of unique species, the area has been used historically as pastureland. Naturum Centre is a visitor centre, which portrays the rich flora, fauna, geology and cultural history of the world famous Ottenby Nature reserve. The varied exhibitions will help you learn more about the area. The Ottenby bird station has been operating since 1946, catching and banding about 20,000 birds every year. However, a visit would not be complete if you do not visit Sweden's tallest lighthouse. The lighthouse goes by the name 'Långe Jan' and has 197 steps.

While exploring Öland, you might find the national dish of potatoes and pork dumplings – kroppkakan. There are, of course, a lot of restaurants with different kinds of food, something for everyone. Visit the Marsjö Ostrich Farm, or maybe Sandvik Windmill. There is a wide range of restaurants and cafés spread all over the island of Öland.


Växjö
This historical city, a centre of learning, will have you amazed whilst walking around its environment. With all the lakes, trees and greenery you will be aware of the beauty in how nature is a natural part of the town. Also, it is characterised by rich culture, environment and sporting, completed with the food of the region. A real landmark in the area is the red cathedral, Växjö Cathedral, with its twin steeples, a reminder of the city's history. This is also noticeable at Kronobergs Castle ruins, where spectacular findings have been revealed. If you are staying in Växjö, you will be staying in a city that has been declared "The greenest city in Europe". This is because of its focus on environmentally-sound solutions and the environmental programmes implemented.

If you would like to savour the nature in Växjö, you should take a walk around the lake "Växjösjön". The lake is located in the center of the city and there is a path that takes you all the way around the lake in about 4.5 kilometres. You could also pay a visit to the wonderful Linnégarden, which in 2007 participated in the Chelsea Flower Show – the most prestigious garden exhibit in Europe – and won a gold medal. Or you could pay a visit to Teleborg Castle park. The castle has been converted to a hotel and conference facility. The park is closely connected to the Linneaus University campus in Växjö with an outstanding view over the lake Trummen.

Växjö also offers a lot of good shopping. The city is full of both shopping centres and small stores along the streets. Linnegallerian is located in the middle of Växjö city and just outside of central Växjö you will find Grand Samarkand, a large shopping centre which was recently named Sweden's best shopping mall.

A signature of Småland and Växjö is that the past is also present in art of glass works. This has roots back to the 1700s. You can visit the Smålands museum, Sweden's glass Museum, located in the lovely museum park. This museum takes you to a magical world of glass with its exciting environment.

See more of Växjö in this official film made by the municipality.

Useful information about Växjö
Tourist Office – Tourist Information Centre, Växjö Turistcenter
Adress: Residenset, Stortorget, Telephone: +46470-73 32 80, E-mail: turism@vaxjo-co.se
Post Office – There is no Post Office in the center of town, but you can buy stamps by tobacconists, for example "Pressbyrån" and also in food shops.
Hospital – Växjö hospital is situated at Strandvägen 8. Telephone number +46470-58 80 00, webpage: www.regionkronoberg.se
Police station – The Police station is situated at Sandgärdsgatan, 31.
www.polisen.se, Telephone number 114 14.
Banks – There are several banks in the center of the town, these banks also have cash dispensers (bankomat in Swedish) but just to mention a few.
Shops - The shops in Växjö are normally open between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. on weekdays. The Linnégallerian i located on Storgatan 10 and Grand Samarkands´ address is, Hejaregatan 32.
Restaurants – In Växjö there is a multitude of restaurants to choose from and that offer a wide variety of cuisines and dishes: American, Indian, Italian, Mexican, Sushi bars, Thai, Tapas bars, and Scandinavian food.
Train station – There are several daily trains to and from Kalmar connecting to Kalmar, Stockholm, Gothenburg and Copenhagen. There are also train connections with Karlskrona.
The train station is situated at Norra Järnvägsgatan 5. You can find more information about train trips on SJ's website.
Sport Centres – Växjö offers a wide variety of sport activities and there are several sport centres where it is possible to workout.
Public Library – The Växjö City Library was built in 1965 and the building is famous for its mix between classicism and modernism. In 2003, the library was extended further with a round house building. The City Library Stadsbiblioteket is open to everyone and here it is possible to find books for children and adults in various languages, newspapers, magazines, language courses, community information, music etc. Borrowing books is free of charge but you need a library ticket which is also issued free of charge. Borrowing time is usually 4 weeks. The library is open 7 days a week during winter and from Monday to Saturday during summer. It is situated at Västra Esplanaden 4, Telephone number +46470-41 444.
Religious places – Many Swedes are secular or atheists but it is far from an irreligious country. Religion still plays an important cultural role. In Växjö Domkyrkan at Linnégatan 2, is well worth the visit.

Learning Swedish

At Linnaeus University we provide courses in Swedish for employees at Linnaeus. For information, check with your HR-partner.
You can also study Swedish free online via Sweden.se or in courses organized by the municipality. There are also several commercial providers of Swedish courses such as Folkuniversitetet and Sensus.


Medical care

In Sweden the health and medical care generally holds a high standard. The residents are subsidised by the state when they receive health and medical care, when they go to a doctor or a dentist. In order to be subsidised, you need a personal identity number.

A visit to a physician may cost around SEK 200, a visit to a specialist or to the emergency clinics at the hospitals costs around SEK 330-420. The medical care services have a system to protect against high costs. You pay up to SEK 1,100 per year. After having paid this sum, health care is free of charge until the end of the 12-months period from the first medical care event.

Children under 20 years with a Swedish personal identity number receive free health care. The Swedish childcare centers also offer support to parents and organise gatherings for new parents living within a given area. Just contact your local childcare center for more information.

Emergencies – dial 112
In case of emergency, this is the number to call for an ambulance, the fire brigade or the police. You will be asked to explain what has happened, where it has happened, and from which number you are calling.


Medical advisory service (Sjukvårdsrådgivningen)
If someone is ill, but it is a non-emergency situation, you can call 1177 and speak to a registered nurse for medical advice. The phone service is open 24 hours a day. You can visit them online at www.1177.se.


Local Health Clinic (Hälsocentral)
The local health clinics are usually open only weekdays from 8 am to 5 pm. You always need to call them in advance to get an appointment.


Hospitals (sjukhus)
For urgent medical care, you may need to visit the hospital.
Websites for the local hospital and other healthcare services in Kalmar.
Websites for the local hospital and other healthcare services in Växjö.


Medication
Prescriptions and over-the-counter medicine are available at local pharmacies (Apotek). Over-the-counter medicine can also be found at larger grocery stores near the cashiers. Pharmacies are open during normal shopping hours, although some may be closed on weekends.

In Sweden, there is a system to protect against high cost linked to prescription medicine, in which you pay up to a certain amount yourself. After having paid that, prescription medicine is paid by the county council until the end of a 12-months period from the first purchase of prescription medication.


Dental Care
The biggest difference between dental care and medical care in Sweden is that you pay a higher proportion of the cost for dental check-ups and treatments yourself. If you stay for more than a year, have a Swedish personal identity number, and pay taxes in Sweden, you are eligible for these reduced dental care costs. EU/EEA citizens staying less than one year are entitled to use the emergency dental care services on the same basis as Swedish citizens, provided they are covered by health insurance in their home country and can produce a European Health Insurance Card.

Prices and guarantees for dental care may vary between different dentists and dental hygienists. There may also be differences depending on where in the country you live. Therefore, you should always ask your dentist or dental hygienist about their prices and guarantees.

Adults pay a large part of their dental care costs themselves, starting January 1 the year they turn 20. However, they also receive financial support from the state for dental surgery. In order to receive this support, you will have to see a dentist or dental hygienist who is affiliated to the Swedish Social Insurance Agency (Försäkringskassan).

Furthermore, there is a 'high cost protection', which means that the state will step in and pay for greater treatments of dental care costs that exceed SEK 3,000 in one year. The first SEK 3,000 is always paid by the patient.

There are several public dental clinics (Folktandvården) in Kalmar/Växjö and there are also private dentists who have contracts with the County Council to provide dental care.


Pregnancy
If you are a Swedish resident (you have a Swedish personal identity number), maternity care such as check-ups during pregnancy, is free of charge. Other costs, such as costs in connection with childbirth, are about the same as a visit to the doctor.

If you are not a resident of Sweden, the GIF insurance pays for necessary and reasonable costs for emergency care in connection with giving birth, miscarriage, or other serious complications prior to the end of week 28 of the pregnancy. In case of giving birth before the end of week 28 of the pregnancy, necessary and reasonable costs for care of the mother and the child will be paid for a period not exceeding 90 days. Other costs for care in connection with pregnancy or childbirth are not paid.


Spouses

This section provides information for spouses about finding a job and learning Swedish.


Finding a job
One of the challenges of moving to a new country as an accompanying spouse is finding an occupation. A good starting point is the website Work in Sweden which is the official source for information about working in Sweden. They also have courses in Swedish that are free of charge.
There are a number of established agencies to approach, for example Arbetsförmedlingen which is a national public agency or Manpower and Proffice (Swedish only), both private agencies.


Unemployment insurance and unions
When you are going to work in Sweden for a longer period of time we advise you to register with a voluntary unemployment fund (A-kassa). To be eligible for unemployment insurance, you must have been working at least 50% of fulltime for at least 6 months during the last 12 months. There are different types of A-kassa. Most of them are connected to a union. You can always make the choice of joining an A-kassa and not the union, or joining a union but not the A-kassa. See for example Akademikernas A-kassa, an unemployment insurance fund for academics.


Travel and driving
In Sweden, it is common for people to ride a bicycle or take the bus to work, which is usually the cheapest way to travel within the city. Most buses depart from railway stations and you can easily buy a bus card at the station. You can look into these websites for more information:
- Klt.se (Kalmar to Hultsfred and local Kalmar)
- Lanstrafikenkron.se (local Växjö)
- Silverlinjen.se (long distance)
- Svenskabuss.se (long distance)
- Ramkvillabuss.se (long distance)

The Swedish rail network is very efficient and covers the whole country, this is the perfect way to travel longer distances, even from Sweden to Denmark. The Öresund train is known for being fast and it takes passengers from Kalmar and Växjö to Lund, Malmö and Copenhagen several times a day. You can find fares and timetables on SJ's website.

Driving is also very common in Sweden – the land of origin of Volvo and Saab. Make sure you have a valid driving license before hitting the road!
Sweden, like most European countries, has right-hand traffic, and you must have your driving license with you whenever you drive.

A driving license issued by an EU/EEA member state is valid in Sweden for the same period of time as it is valid in the country where it was issued, as long as it has not been exchanged for a Swedish license. You may exchange your driving license for an equivalent Swedish driving license if you reside in Sweden permanently. However, driving licenses from EU/EEA states are valid in Sweden regardless of how long the holder is registered in the country, and it is therefore not necessary to exchange an EU/EEA driving license for a Swedish one.

A driving license issued from a non-EU/EEA member states is valid in Sweden if it is valid in the country where it has been issued, as long as it has not been exchanged for a Swedish license. However, it is not valid in Sweden if you have been registered as a resident in Sweden for more than one year. There are international agreements on how a driving license is to be designed. A driving license which has not been designed according to these rules and which has not been issued in English, German, or French is valid only with a certified translation to English, German, French, Swedish, Danish, or Norwegian. Please also note that if the driving license does not have a photograph, it will be valid only with an identification document containing a photograph.

A driving license from a non-EU/EEA country cannot be exchanged for a Swedish driving license, unless the driving license is issued in Switzerland or Japan.

Read more about foreign driving licenses at Körkortsportalen.