Workshop during International Staff Training Week

Knowledge exchange and skills development during International Staff Training Week

For the seventh year in a row, participants from all over the world gathered to take part in International Staff Training Wek at Linnaeus University. The participants were teachers and administrators from 17 different countries who were given the opportunity to develop their skills within intercultural communication.

All week last week, roughly 40 participants visited Linnaeus University during the annual International Staff Training Week. The programme consisted of everything from a visit to Borgholm Castle and Solliden on the island of Öland and a guided tour at the glassworks in Orrefors, to workshops and seminars at Linnaeus University.

The workshops have focused on, among other things, intercultural communication, conflict management, and future internationalisation at home. Activities have to a large extent been characterised by interaction between participants, something that has been highly popular.

“We come from different countries with different customs and cultures. It is very rewarding to have conversations and do things together; it is a good way to learn new things. The workshop we are doing right now is particularly interesting since it deals with conflict management. The collaboration and the meetings make us more open and understanding towards each other, and that’s something that I would like to bring with me home”, says Marieke Hagemans, drama teacher at Saxion University in the Netherlands.

The participants also seem to have gotten a good impression of Linnaeus University and they are happy with the knowledge exchange and the networking that the week has offered.

“I get the impression that there is a very open climate at Linnaeus University. Members of staff have been helpful and welcoming. I joked around with my course mates saying that perhaps I should come here for my master’s. There also seem to be plenty of resources and technology. I would like to implement a queue system that I’ve seen here back home in Johannesburg. When students come asking for assistance, they state their case and are given a number. I think this would make our activities more efficient and raise the level of the service provided to our students”, says Malibongwe Masango, administrator at University of Johannesburg in South Africa.

The visiting participants returned home last Friday after a concluding lunch at Teleborg Castle.

 

Malibongwe Masango, administrator at University of Johannesburg in South Africa.
Malibongwe Masango, administrator at University of Johannesburg in South Africa.
Marieke Hagemans, drama teacher at Saxion University in the Netherlands.
Marieke Hagemans, drama teacher at Saxion University in the Netherlands.