Top row from left: Tamara Ann Tinner, Brinda Kumar, Maria Hasfeldt and Martin van der Linden. Bottom row from left: Elliott Berggren, Franklin Martinez and Beatriz Carlsson Pecharromán

Seven new PhD students in Global Humanities

Now they are here, the seven PhD students who this fall will start the new interdisciplinary doctoral research training program in Global Humanities at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities.

"We made a broad international announcement and received over 100 applicants", says Stefan Amirell, Professor of History, who is in charge of the program. "We selected the best and have received a very exciting and diversified group of PhD students from five countries; Colombia, Denmark, India, Switzerland and Sweden."

Global Humanities is a new field of research – interdisciplinary and global with a humanistic tone, where future studies are an important part.

"At Linnaeus, the doctoral research education in Global Humanities spans the subjects of history, religious studies, comparative literarture (including language subjects with a focus on comparative literarature) and archaeology. Unfortunately, this time there was no PhD student in archaeology, but I hope there will be next time. The hope is that we will be able to accept at least five new PhD students in two years."

"We emphasize that this is a high-quality international doctoral research training program with an ambitious course package and regular seminar activities", says Stefan Amirell.

"The fact that the seven PhD students start at the same time also means that a lively and stimulating environment is created. In addition, the PhD students contribute to the research environment at the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, among other things by the fact that they are all linked to an LNUC. Five are linked to LNUC for Concurrences in Colonial and Postcolonial Studies and two to LNUC for Intermedial and Multimodal Studies."

The Faculty of Arts and Humanities finances the education of five of the PhD students, one of whom is also affiliated with the National Graduate School of Historical Studies. Two PhD students are funded by LNUC Concurrences.

Learn more about the new research program in Global Humanities.

The PhD students and their subjects (main supervisor in brackets)

History

Brinda Kumar
Eastern Himalayan Borderlands: Region, Community, Labour and Environment in 20th century India
(Gunnel Cederlöf, Professor in History)

Franklin Martinez
Cattle in the Americas: A Comparative Study of the Presence of Cattle between 1492 and 1620
(Gunnel Cederlöf, Professor of History)

Tamara Ann Tinner
Fashioning Philippine Muslim Indigeneity and the Multifaceted Indigenous Archive
(Stefan Amirell, Professor of History)

The Study of Religion

Maria Hasfeldt
Changes of Heaven (天): The Semiotic Value of “Heaven” in the Diagrams of The Mandate of Heaven by the Korean 16th Century Philosopher T’oegye Yi Hwang
(Stefan Arvidsson, Professor of the Study of Religion)

Martin van der Linden
Shinto and Soft Power: Pop-culture Diplomacy and Aesthetics of Religion in the Digital Age
(Jonas Svensson, Professor of the Study of Religion)

English Literature

Elliott Berggren
Poetics of the Grotesque in Stephen Graham Jones’ Fiction
(Johan Höglund, Professor of English Literature)

Literature

Beatriz Carlsson Pecharromán
Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Imperialism on the Literary Aesthetics of Nostalgia
(Niklas Salmose, Professor of English Literature)

 

Caption:
Top row from left: Tamara Ann Tinner, Brinda Kumar, Maria Hasfeldt and Martin van der Linden. Bottom row from left: Elliott Berggren, Franklin Martinez and Beatriz Carlsson Pecharromán