Algoland - Algal Solutions for Air, Water, Industry and Society

Our research group studies the capacity of microalgae to purify air and water, produce energy and biomass and contribute to sustainable societal development.

Our Research

The Algoland team, led by Elin Lindehoff and Catherine Legrand, operates a series of research projects that explore sustainable, algae-based solutions to societal challenges. Starting at Linnaeus University, we have branched out to form myriad industry – municipal – academia partnerships, with a network that stretches further each year. We also have an extensive science outreach program for teaching the community about the importance of algae in society.

Our research addresses global environmental problems at a local level:

  • Use of fossil fuels
  • Climate change
  • CO2 emissions
  • Polluted water
  • Eutrophication

Follow our blog!

Publications

Our Research – in pictures

Academia and Industry partnerships. Algoland Inauguration Day at the Degerhamn Cementa plant. Catherine Legrand (Professor in Marine Biology, Algoland PI) and Claes Kollberg, Cementa plant manager, Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development. Academia and Industry working together to find sustainable solutions.
Academia and Industry partnerships. Algoland Inauguration Day at the Degerhamn Cementa plant. Catherine Legrand (Professor in Marine Biology, Algoland PI) and Claes Kollberg, Cementa plant manager, Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development. Academia and Industry working together to find sustainable solutions. Elin Lindehoff
Previous Image Next Image
Microalgae – tiny heroes of the sea. Accounting for 40-80% of the world’s oxygen, microalgae have the potential to mitigate CO2 emissions from harmful polluters like the cement industry, as well as take up excess nutrients that cause eutrophication in the sea. The algal biomass that is produced can then be turned into valuable bioproducts.
Microalgae – tiny heroes of the sea. Accounting for 40-80% of the world’s oxygen, microalgae have the potential to mitigate CO2 emissions from harmful polluters like the cement industry, as well as take up excess nutrients that cause eutrophication in the sea. The algal biomass that is produced can then be turned into valuable bioproducts. Lina Mattsson
Previous Image Next Image
Cleaning the Water.  Raceway ponds at the Moskogen landfill are filled with leachate water, whose excess nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) are used to grow algae. Gas is pumped in from the KalmarEnergi heating company nearby to expedite the growing process.
Cleaning the Water. Raceway ponds at the Moskogen landfill are filled with leachate water, whose excess nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) are used to grow algae. Gas is pumped in from the Kalmar Energi heating company nearby to expedite the growing process. Lina Mattsson
Previous Image Next Image
Cleaning the water - Valorization of biomass.  Algoland research activities yield and algal biomass product that can be used as animal feed, supplements, fertilizers, biofuels.
Cleaning the water - Valorization of biomass. Algoland research activities yield and algal biomass product that can be used as animal feed, supplements, fertilizers, biofuels.
Lina Mattsson
Previous Image Next Image
Cleaning the water - Mussel farming. Mussels grow in coastal areas and can act as a nutrient sink in the Baltic Sea with no added resources. Mussels filter seawater to obtain their natural food of choice: microalgae.
Cleaning the water - Mussel farming. Mussels grow in coastal areas and can act as a nutrient sink in the Baltic Sea with no added resources. Mussels filter seawater to obtain their natural food of choice: microalgae.
Kimberly Berglöf
Previous Image Next Image
The circular economy – sustainable feed from mussels and algae. This Algoland project has collaborated with Voxtorp farm to study the feasibility of using crushed mussel meal and dried algae in chicken feed.
The circular economy – sustainable feed from mussels and algae. This Algoland project has collaborated with Voxtorp farm to study the feasibility of using crushed mussel meal and dried algae in chicken feed. Elin Lindehoff
Previous Image Next Image
Cleaning the Air: The Green Wall Panel at the Cementa factory in Degerhamn, Sweden (Öland) on inauguration day, June 14th 2014. Throughout the summer season and into the fall, microalgae grow and multiply, as CO2 -filled flue gas from the factory bubbles into the panel.
Cleaning the Air: The Green Wall Panel at the Cementa factory in Degerhamn, Sweden (Öland) on inauguration day, June 14th 2014. Throughout the summer season and into the fall, microalgae grow and multiply, as CO2 -filled flue gas from the factory bubbles into the panel. Elin Lindehoff
Previous Image Next Image

Projects

A film about Algoland

Choose "CC" for captions in English

The Algoland Team

Current