A red heart with two band-aid on.

Project: Internet compassion-course for healthcare professionals

The aim of this study is to investigate whether who different internet-based courses for healthcare professionals contributes to reduce work-related stress and increase quality of life and self-compassion.

Facts about the project

Project manager
Anna Bratt
Other project members
Project coordinator, Maude Johansson, Linnaeus University, Associate project manager, Viktor Kaldo, Linnaeus University, Mats Holmberg, Region Sörmland Cecilia Fagerström, Region Kalmar, Carina Elmqvist, Region Kronoberg, Marie Rusner, Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Region Västra Götaland
Participating organizations
Linnaeus University, Region Sörmland, Region Kalmar, Region Kronoberg, Region Västra Götaland
Financier
Linnaeus University
Timetable
2021-01-01 – 2024-01-01
Subject
Clinical psychology (Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences)

More about the project

Reactions to severe stress is one of the most common causes of sick leave in Sweden. Previous research has shown that compassion interventions for staff can affect work-related stress by increased self-care, better self-awareness and an increased healthy attitude, however, Swedish studies on the subject are scarce.

Compassion is a motivation to reduce suffering in oneself and others characterized by a warm, understanding, and respectful attitude. In addition to beneficial effects for the staff, a compassion-oriented approach, has shown to improve the relationship between patient and staff, increase patient satisfaction with care and reduce patient anxiety and stress.

As a result of the covid-19 pandemic, healthcare professionals have been exposed to difficult physical and mental work conditions that cause feelings of stress and inadequacy. In the long run, increased stress can cause fatigue and increased number of sick leaves. This can in turn contribute to increased stress for the staff who remain working and difficulties to recruit new staff, which make the situation worse. There is a lack of interventions for staff aimed at preventing stress-related health issues, enabling recovery and reduce mental suffering linked to a stressful work situations.

The aim of this study is test whether two different courses help healthcare providers cope with work-related stress particularly during the current covid-19 pandemic.